Ephemera

  • Orange Slide - Santa Monica Beach, California c2005
  • Sky Diver - 4th of July Parade - Pacific Palisades, California c2013
  • Barnacle Bill - Santa Cruz Boardwalk c2004
  • Wedding Gowns - Los Angeles - c2004
  • Bens De Luxe Delicatessen - Montreal, Quebec c2005
  • YUL Sky Lounge - Montreal, Quebec c2005
  • Mike's Bar-B-Que - Memphis, Tennessee c2004
  • Del Rio Lanes - Downey, California c2004
  • Office Park at Dusk - Hoboken, New Jersey c2004
  • Hotel Room - Vancouver, British Columbia c2005

The Ephemera collection features locations and objects, scenery and celebrations, fleeting instants of magic and perfection that seem to give structure, continuity, and meaning to impermanent, fluid, ever-changing existence.

Orange Slide – Santa Monica Beach, California c2005

Orange Slide – Santa Monica Beach, California c2005

This ordinary play structure on a Southern California beach becomes the centerpiece of a perfectly balanced geometric abstraction. The orange slide and hand rails compliment the bands of blue sky, ocean and the slide’s blue structural supports.

Sky Diver – 4th of July Parade – Pacific Palisades, California c2013

Sky Diver – 4th of July Parade – Pacific Palisades, California c2013

A harrowing public spectacle, reminiscent of photography by pre-eminent lifestyle photographer Jacques-Henri Lartigue, captured as this local 4th of July parade begins.

Barnacle Bill – Santa Cruz Boardwalk c2004

Barnacle Bill – Santa Cruz Boardwalk c2004

Iconic tableau from the landscape of Americana: the fast-food grill. Here reconceived as a 'found' art installation.

Wedding Gowns – Los Angeles – c2004

Wedding Gowns – Los Angeles – c2004

A deeper look at this ‘found’ installation evokes the hopes, dreams and longings associated with matrimony, the most vital of our human institutions.

Bens De Luxe Delicatessen – Montreal, Quebec c2005

Bens De Luxe Delicatessen – Montreal, Quebec c2005

The delicatessen marries epicurean delight with sustenance in the North American psyche, and also venerates our immigrant heritage. A delicatessen is the happy meeting of old-world flavors and new world palettes.

YUL Sky Lounge – Montreal, Quebec c2005

YUL Sky Lounge – Montreal, Quebec c2005

The airport lounge is a nexus, a weigh station: transition, nervous anticipation, dislocation, chance encounters, common experience. All emotions are available. All contradictions are held. Air travel is always a possible (positively) life-altering or (negatively) life-ending event.

Mike’s Bar-B-Que – Memphis, Tennessee c2004

Mike’s Bar-B-Que – Memphis, Tennessee c2004

Morning in America. The 'greasy spoon.' This Memphis diner — now defunct ⎯ is located geographically and spiritually in the middle of America. Memphis is a melting pot city on the western fringe of Tennessee, and port of call along the Mississippi River. The central 'common man' reads his, now obsolete, PAPER newspaper. This image examines opposing currents of timelessness and obsolescence.

Del Rio Lanes – Downey, California c2004

Del Rio Lanes – Downey, California c2004

Bowling is a peculiar activity. No one cares if you’re skilled or not. Yet there is something enthralling and worthwhile about it. The bowling alley is a triumph of low culture, yet the high aesthetics of light and shadow, symmetry and forced perspective are transformative. It is church-like, though unpretentious, and includes the rituals of shoe-change and ball-selection.

Office Park at Dusk – Hoboken, New Jersey c2004

Office Park at Dusk – Hoboken, New Jersey c2004

Office park as Urban Abstraction. The image conveys emotions around the end of daytime, the close of business, the beginning of a commute, the transition from professional to personal. The style and color scheme explores similar motifs to the paintings of Edward Hopper and John Register.

Hotel Room – Vancouver, British Columbia c2005

Hotel Room – Vancouver, British Columbia c2005

Life as a cinematographer took the artist to far flung locales. "I always worked as part of a crew, so was usually with colleagues. But there were times, frequently at the end of a workday, when I was on my own and reminded of the thrill and poignant ennui of dislocation."

Julian Whatley